Consumer Protection

Protesters urge regulators to block Duke Energy plan

A public protest kicked off a week of hearings today on Duke Energy's controversial energy efficiency proposal called Save-a-Watt.

News Release | NCPIRG | Consumer Protection

Broad coalition calls on Duke to pull the plug on costly “Save-a-Watt”

Raleigh, NC.  Consumer, labor, and environmental groups rallied on the steps of the Utilities Commission today, calling on Duke Energy to withdraw its controversial “Save-a-Watt” proposal. It is the first energy efficiency proposal to be heard by the Utilities Commission since the passage of the major energy bill last year.  The groups argue that the program costs too much and does too little.  They urged Duke to support independently-run energy efficiency programs. 

CPSC Data Show Safety Recalls Increased 22% Over Last Year

The number of recalls of toys and children’s products is up 22% over the first half of last year, despite industry promises last year to solve the problems that made 2007 the “year of the recall,” according to an analysis of Consumer Product Safety Commission data by the nation’s leading consumer groups. The groups urged Congress to complete a “strong CPSC Reform Act” before the August recess.

Save-A-Watt costly, saves little

Duke Energy has proposed a new version of an “energy-efficiency” program. The proposal, called Save-A-Watt, would be wildly expensive but provide little energy savings. Not only would Duke be paid for the cost of the program, but also for 90 percent of the cost of power plants it doesn't have to build.

News Release | NCPIRG | Consumer Protection

CPSC Data Show Safety Recalls Increased 22% Over Last Year

The number of recalls of toys and children’s products is up 22% over the first half of last year, despite industry promises last year to solve the problems that made 2007 the “year of the recall,” according to an analysis of Consumer Product Safety Commission data by the nation’s leading consumer groups. The groups urged Congress to complete a “strong CPSC Reform Act” before the August recess.

Report | NCPIRG | Consumer Protection

Total Recall: The Need for CPCS Reform Now

The year 2007 was called the year of the recall. But in 2008, recalls are up, according to Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) data. Already, as these data show, more toys and children’s products have been recalled in the first half of this year than in the first half of last year, a supposed “100-year-flood” period. Yet the remedial CPSC reform legislation passed overwhelmingly by both the House and Senate in response to that 2007 recall wave has yet to become law. It is stalled in conference committee, where both the toy and chemical industries seek to block, weaken or delay some of its most critical reforms. This report explains why Congress needs to enact a strong final law that includes all of these key uncompleted reforms -- a new toy standard that requires mandatory safety testing for toys, a ban on toxic phthalates and whistleblower protections -- while rejecting industry’s eleventh-hour demands to add new and unprecedented limits on state authority to enforce and enact product safety laws.

Teams push ticket scalping

The Carolina Hurricanes and other pro sports franchises are supporting a bill that would let fans buy scalped tickets over the Internet for North Carolina games and shows.

Progress asks $42M a year to cover energy-saving plan

Progress Energy now awaits regulatory approval of a slate of efficiency programs, all aimed at reducing the amount of energy the utility must produce to meet demand. The programs range from cycling air conditioner use at homes to promoting construction that meets federal Energy Star standards.

A 'green coal baron'?

Some readers of a recent New York Times Magazine profile of Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers were no doubt surprised by the piece. If its title, "A Green Coal Baron?" flummoxed some readers, the article's general thrust likely have frustrated others.

N.C. Public Staff challenges Progress Energy bid for flight rate

Under Progress Energy's plans to recover from ratepayers its costs for investing in renewable energy, a studio apartment resident would pay the same as the resident of a palatial home whose monthly electricity usage reaches 40,000 kilowat hours.

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